All posts by Anne Page

Research Associate: The Correspondence of Daniel Defoe

KEELE UNIVERSITY

FACULTY OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

Research Associate – The Correspondence of Daniel Defoe (1 year fixed term)

Grade 7 Starting salary £32,004

Keele University is renowned for its exciting approach to higher education, innovative research, beautiful campus, strong community spirit and excellent student experience. With a turnover in excess of £134 million, over 10,000 students and a total staff of approximately 2000, the University provides high quality teaching across a wide range of academic and vocational subjects and promotes world-class research. Further information can be found at http://www.keele.ac.uk.

We are seeking to appoint a Research Associate. This post represents an exciting opportunity for an ambitious individual to work on an Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funded project entitled ‘The Correspondence of Daniel Defoe’. The project will produce a new scholarly edition for Cambridge University Press of the letters of Defoe (1660-1731) and investigate the literary, personal, and political contexts of Defoe’s correspondence and related writings.

The successful candidate will undertake archival and bibliographic research into primary and secondary materials relating to Defoe’s life and writings. This involves conducting archival work in England and Scotland to source and transcribe primary materials. You will have the opportunity to communicate findings to academic and other audiences at conferences along with assisting in the planning of training events and public engagement activities.

Applicants must a have a PhD in literature or history (ideally with a focus on the seventeenth or eighteenth centuries) or equivalent qualification, and experience of planning and conducting research activities including collecting and analysing data. To be successful you must have excellent communication skills, with a professional and flexible approach to work and be skilled in writing high quality reports and other research documentation.

The post is available for 1 year with an expected start date of the 1st September 2017. 

For full post details please visit: www.keele.ac.uk/vacancies

Closing date for applications: 15th May 2017
Interviews will be held 9th June 2017
Post reference: KU00000451

CFP: Devotional Writing in Print and Manuscript

CALL FOR PAPERS:

‘Devotional Writing in Print and Manuscript in Early Modern England, 1558-1700’

 University of Warwick, Monday 26 June 2017, Ramphal Building

Plenary Speakers:

Emeritus Prof Bernard Capp (Warwick) and Dr Johanna Harris (Exeter)

‘Devotional Writing in Print and Manuscript’ is a major multi-disciplinary conference, hosted by the University of Warwick’s English Department in collaboration with the Centre for the Study of the Renaissance, the Humanities Research Centre and the Early Modern Forum.  Contributions are invited from established scholars and postgraduate students alike.  Publication of a selection of papers is envisioned.

Themes for papers may include (but are not limited to): literary, visual. political, theological, historical, material, musical, polemical or any other treatments of the topics of devotional writing in print or manuscript in the context of reformation-era England.

These may include:

  • Piety of the Household/Neighbourhood
  • Children, Catechism and Memory
  • Temptation/Possession/Conversion Narratives
  • Fasts/Feasts/Thanksgiving Days
  • Prayer Books/Church Books/Book of Sports
  • Psalmody versus Hymnody
  • Playhouses, the Pulpit, and the Theatre of the Word
  • Sick-bed/Death-bed Accounts (ars moriendi)
  • Godly Missives and Communal Correspondences
  • Martyrology/Hagiography
  • Religious Iconography/Graffiti/Objects
  • Biblicism versus Fanaticism
  • Spiritual Manuals and/or Cases of Conscience

Please send abstracts/panel proposals of no more than 300 words for a 20-minute paper (along with a brief biography) by 30 April 2017 to: devotionalwritinginengland@gmail.com.

For more information, see: https://devotionalwritinginprintandmanuscriptinearlymodernengland.com

 

International John Bunyan Society: registration for the regional day conference

The registration is open for:

PRISONS AND PRISON WRITING IN EARLY MODERN BRITAIN

A Regional Day Conference of the International John Bunyan Society, organized in association with the University of Bedfordshire, Keele University, and Northumbria University

Northumbria University, Newcastle, Monday 10 April 2017

For the programme and registration details, click here.

Dr Williams’s Library 2017 programme

Wednesday 22nd March, 2017 (5:15pm–6:45pm)

‘Behold, how great a fire a little matter kindleth!’: Dissenting Silver in the Collection of Dr Williams’s Library

Dr Helen Clifford, Curator of Swaledale Museum North Yorkshire

Thursday 4th May, 2017 (4:00pm–7:00pm)

Database Launch: GEMMS: The Gateway to Early Modern Manuscript Sermons

Professor Jeanne Shami, Regina

Dr Anne James, Regina

Booking required

Saturday 20th May, 2017 (10:00am–5:00pm)

Conference: Evangelicalism and Dissent

Robert Strivens (London Seminary), ‘Dissent and the Origins of the Evangelical Revival’

Martin Wellings (Wesley Memorial Church, Oxford), ‘Wesleyan Methodism and Dissent’

Timothy Larsen (Wheaton College, Illinois), ‘Congregationalists and Crucicentrism’

John Maiden (Open University), ‘The New Nonconformity’

Booking required

Wednesday 14th June, 2017 (5:15pm–6:45pm)

Professor Ann Hughes, Keele

Title to be announced.

Further details: conference@dwlib.co.uk

CFP: Prison/exile: Controlled Spaces in Early Modern Europe

Call for Papers: Prison/Exile: Controlled Spaces in Early Modern Europe
10–11 March 2017 | Ertegun House, University of Oxford
 
This conference seeks to explore the relationship between space, identity, and religious belief in early modern Europe, through the correlative yet distinct experiences of imprisonment and exile. The organisers welcome all paper proposals that explore the phenomena of imprisonment and exile in the early modern period, especially those that relate these modalities of control to the complex and evolving religious thought of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe. At a time when incarceration or exile was a distinct possibility, even likelihood, for many of Europe’s innovative thinkers, how did the experience of imprisonment or banishment influence the texts—theological, political, and literary—produced in the early modern period? How did early modern individuals inhabit, conceptualise, and represent “unfree” space? How does the spatial turn help us to investigate the impact of the confines of prison or the exile’s physical separation from their community on the production and development of religious thought? Does imprisonment or exile exaggerate polemical language and heighten sectarian differences, or induce censorship and temper dissenting voices?
 
Keynote lectures will be given by Professor Rivkah Zim (King’s College, London) and Professor Bruce Gordon (Yale University).
 
We invite 20-minute papers, from literary, historical, theological, and interdisciplinary perspectives, on these themes. We are especially interested in papers connecting imprisonment and exile, and in those linking physical spaces with the world of ideas and texts. 
 
Potential topics might include, but are not limited to:
 
– prison writings and literature produced in exile
– the emergence of the prison as a mode of punishment, including responses to the work of Michel Foucault, Norbert Elias, and other theorists
– the utility of the genre of prison writings, alongside considerations of audience, reception, and intention
– spatial confines of imprisonment
– captivity, relationships between captor and captive, cultural issues arising from captivity
– mental and physical separation from community
– distinctions and connections between imprisonment and exile
– monastic prisons
– literary consolation
– literary and figurative conceptualisations of imprisonment and exile
– mental and physical isolation, and afflictions experienced whilst incarcerated
– imprisonment or exile as themes or images in theology and exegesis
 
The organisers, Spencer Weinreich, Chiara Giovanni, and Anik Laferrière, look forward to receiving proposals, particularly from postgraduate students and early career researchers, and are glad to answer any queries. Proposals should include a title and abstract of a maximum of 250 words, and should be sent to prisonexileoxford@gmail.com by 9 January 2017.

International John Bunyan Society Study Day

A Regional Day Conference of the International John Bunyan Society, organized in association with the University of Bedfordshire, Keele University, and Northumbria University will take place at Northumbria University, Newcastle, Monday 10 April 2017.

The theme is :

PRISONS AND PRISON WRITING IN EARLY MODERN BRITAIN

For more information and to download the CFP, please click here.