All posts by Anne Page

Dr Williams’s Library 2017 programme

Wednesday 22nd March, 2017 (5:15pm–6:45pm)

‘Behold, how great a fire a little matter kindleth!’: Dissenting Silver in the Collection of Dr Williams’s Library

Dr Helen Clifford, Curator of Swaledale Museum North Yorkshire

Thursday 4th May, 2017 (4:00pm–7:00pm)

Database Launch: GEMMS: The Gateway to Early Modern Manuscript Sermons

Professor Jeanne Shami, Regina

Dr Anne James, Regina

Booking required

Saturday 20th May, 2017 (10:00am–5:00pm)

Conference: Evangelicalism and Dissent

Robert Strivens (London Seminary), ‘Dissent and the Origins of the Evangelical Revival’

Martin Wellings (Wesley Memorial Church, Oxford), ‘Wesleyan Methodism and Dissent’

Timothy Larsen (Wheaton College, Illinois), ‘Congregationalists and Crucicentrism’

John Maiden (Open University), ‘The New Nonconformity’

Booking required

Wednesday 14th June, 2017 (5:15pm–6:45pm)

Professor Ann Hughes, Keele

Title to be announced.

Further details: conference@dwlib.co.uk

CFP: Prison/exile: Controlled Spaces in Early Modern Europe

Call for Papers: Prison/Exile: Controlled Spaces in Early Modern Europe
10–11 March 2017 | Ertegun House, University of Oxford
 
This conference seeks to explore the relationship between space, identity, and religious belief in early modern Europe, through the correlative yet distinct experiences of imprisonment and exile. The organisers welcome all paper proposals that explore the phenomena of imprisonment and exile in the early modern period, especially those that relate these modalities of control to the complex and evolving religious thought of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe. At a time when incarceration or exile was a distinct possibility, even likelihood, for many of Europe’s innovative thinkers, how did the experience of imprisonment or banishment influence the texts—theological, political, and literary—produced in the early modern period? How did early modern individuals inhabit, conceptualise, and represent “unfree” space? How does the spatial turn help us to investigate the impact of the confines of prison or the exile’s physical separation from their community on the production and development of religious thought? Does imprisonment or exile exaggerate polemical language and heighten sectarian differences, or induce censorship and temper dissenting voices?
 
Keynote lectures will be given by Professor Rivkah Zim (King’s College, London) and Professor Bruce Gordon (Yale University).
 
We invite 20-minute papers, from literary, historical, theological, and interdisciplinary perspectives, on these themes. We are especially interested in papers connecting imprisonment and exile, and in those linking physical spaces with the world of ideas and texts. 
 
Potential topics might include, but are not limited to:
 
– prison writings and literature produced in exile
– the emergence of the prison as a mode of punishment, including responses to the work of Michel Foucault, Norbert Elias, and other theorists
– the utility of the genre of prison writings, alongside considerations of audience, reception, and intention
– spatial confines of imprisonment
– captivity, relationships between captor and captive, cultural issues arising from captivity
– mental and physical separation from community
– distinctions and connections between imprisonment and exile
– monastic prisons
– literary consolation
– literary and figurative conceptualisations of imprisonment and exile
– mental and physical isolation, and afflictions experienced whilst incarcerated
– imprisonment or exile as themes or images in theology and exegesis
 
The organisers, Spencer Weinreich, Chiara Giovanni, and Anik Laferrière, look forward to receiving proposals, particularly from postgraduate students and early career researchers, and are glad to answer any queries. Proposals should include a title and abstract of a maximum of 250 words, and should be sent to prisonexileoxford@gmail.com by 9 January 2017.

International John Bunyan Society Study Day

A Regional Day Conference of the International John Bunyan Society, organized in association with the University of Bedfordshire, Keele University, and Northumbria University will take place at Northumbria University, Newcastle, Monday 10 April 2017.

The theme is :

PRISONS AND PRISON WRITING IN EARLY MODERN BRITAIN

For more information and to download the CFP, please click here.

 

Enlightening Enthusiasm

We are pleased to announce the publication of Lionel Laborie’s monograph, Enlightening Enthusiasm: Prophecy and Religious Experience in Early Eighteenth-Century England (Manchester University Press, 2015).

‘In the summer 1706, three Protestant refugees from the last French war of religion arrived in London to prophesy the fall of Rome and Christ’s imminent Second Coming. They claimed to be inspired by the Holy Spirit, experienced bodily agitations and sought to revive the apostolic Church. Within two years, these ‘French Prophets’ counted nearly 500 followers, including Huguenots, Anglicans, Philadelphians, Quakers, Presbyterians, Baptists, Quietists and even Jews. Their movement launched missionary tribes after failing to resurrect one of their members from the dead and spread across Europe. They remained active in Britain until the late 1740s, reappearing sporadically among the first Methodists, Moravians and Shakers.

Screen Shot 2015-10-05 at 17.42.49
The French Prophets sparked one of the greatest controversies in eighteenth-century England, marked by a prodigious battle of pamphlets on revealed religion and miracles, violent riots and a political trial. They were branded as ‘enthusiasts’, then a derogatory label for religious fanaticism, but one whose modern representation largely draws upon the hostile discourse of Augustan moralists.

This book examines the nature of religious enthusiasm against the backdrop of the early English Enlightenment. It offers the first comprehensive approach to enthusiasm by looking at this multifarious issue from a social, religious, cultural, political and medical perspective. Based on new archival research, it challenges our modern understanding of this originally infamous term by dissociating religious experience from millenarianism, radical dissent and popular religion, to shed new light on the reality of enthusiasm in early Enlightenment England.’

The book can be ordered from the publisher’s website, http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/cgi-bin/indexer?product=9780719089886

Reliquiae Baxterianae: Online Exhibition

The wonderful online exhibition devoted to the Reliquiae Baxterianae is now online from the Google Cultural Institute and provides a wealth of information about the Baxter manuscripts, their state of preservation, their successive editions, as well as the reception of Baxter’s œuvre and much else besides.

Capture d’écran 2015-10-04 à 11.44.43Completed with filmed interviews by the team members and staff of Dr Williams’s Library.

The exhibition is beautifully curated, as well as entertaining, and is a mine of information for anybody with an interest in early-modern dissenting culture. We highly recommend it!

See: https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/exhibit/-AJC4CrPoff9KA?position=7%3A0

BSECS 2016: Writing, Religion, and Enlightenment Panel

Call for Papers: Writing, Religion, and Enlightenment panel at BSECS 2016 (St Hugh’s College, Oxford, 6th-8th January 2016)

The focus of this panel is the relationship between writing and religion in the period of the Enlightenment (broadly interpreted). We invite proposals for 20 minute papers on this theme in relation to texts, from the canonical to the unpublished, connected with or produced by different religious denominations and communities (Anglican, Dissenting, Catholic, Jewish, Baptist, Quaker and others). We are open to methodological approaches drawn from different disciplines, but the central concerns of the panel are: i) The ways in which individuals and groups represent and live their religious faith and identity through the reading, writing, and dissemination of texts; and ii) critical analysis of texts that might be termed ‘religious’ with a particular attention to language, form and genre.

Additional questions that the panel might address include, but are not limited to:

  • How were religious genres including hymnody, sermon and prayer conceived of in the period? What differentiates them from genres in the secular tradition?
  • How do religious writers imagine their readers?
  • How can religious texts be situated within the textual landscape of the Enlightenment? And in what ways do they engage with key Enlightenment debates (including, for example, ideas of self and of agency, rationality, and forms of knowledge)?
  • How do eighteenth-century writers validate their religious writing, and on what grounds do they negotiate the internal and external authority of their work?
  • How might we counter claims that religious writing fails to conform to the ideal of the literary?
  • What are the advantages/limitations of seeking to recuperate close reading and form-based criticism as an alternative to the historicist monopoly over the study of religious literature?
  • What can we learn from an investigation of religious writing that might influence our analysis of literary texts more broadly?

This panel represents the latest in a series of events organised by the panel chairs, and suitable papers will be considered for a planned publication comprising a journal special edition on this theme in 2017.

Abstracts of 250 words or fewer should be submitted by midnight on 11th October 2015 to L.I.Davies@soton.ac.uk

Details of the BSECS Annual Conference can be found at http://www.bsecs.org.uk/

The Crisis of British Protestantism

Hunter Powell’s monograph, The Crisis of British Protestantism: Church Power in the Puritan Revolution, 1638–44,  is now out with Manchester University Press.

‘This book seeks to bring coherence to two of the most studied periods in British history, Caroline non-conformity (pre-1640) and the British revolution (post-1642). It does so by focusing on the pivotal years of 1638–44 where debates around non-conformity within the Church of England morphed into a revolution between Parliament and its king. Parliament, saddled with the responsibility of re-defining England’s church, called its Westminster assembly of divines to debate and define the content and boundaries of that new church.

Screen Shot 2015-09-30 at 16.33.54

Typically this period has been studied as either an ecclesiastical power struggle between Presbyterians and independents, or as the harbinger of modern religious toleration. This book challenges those assumptions and provides an entirely new framework for understanding one of the most important moments in British history’.

To order, see the publisher’s website, http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/cgi-bin/indexer?product=9780719096341

Baxter Symposium: Programme

Richard Baxter Quatercentenary Symposium
Friday 13 November 2015
Dr Williams’s Library, 14 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0AR

2015 marks the 400th anniversary of the birth of the Puritan pastor and writer, Richard Baxter (1615-1691). A symposium to commemorate this event and to assess the significance of Baxter’s contribution to seventeenth-century religious, political, literary and scientific culture in Britain, Europe and North America will be held at Dr Williams’s Library on Friday 13 November 2015. Confirmed speakers include Professor Nigel Smith (Princeton), Professor Ann Hughes (Keele) and Professor Howard  Hotson (Oxford).

The event will also profile two major editorial projects designed to make Baxter’s key manuscripts accessible to a contemporary scholarly readership:

The AHRC-funded edition of Reliquiae Baxterianae and the nine-volume edition of Baxter’s correspondence (both forthcoming with Oxford University Press).

Provisional Programme
12:00-12:30   Buffet Lunch
Richard Baxter and Seventeenth-Century Britain, Europe and North America
12:30-13:15   Professor Howard Hotson (Oxford) Title TBC
13:15-14:00   Professor Ann Hughes (Keele) ‘”Doubtless a godly man, though tenacious in his mistakes” (Simeon Ashe on Richard Baxter, 1656): Baxter and English Presbyterians’
14:00-14:45   Professor Nigel Smith (Princeton) ‘Richard Baxter and International Protestantism: by Grammar or by Numbers’
14:45-15:15   Further Discussion
15:15-15:30 Coffee Break
15:30-16:30 The Editing of Richard Baxter
Professor Neil Keeble (Stirling) and Dr Thomas Charlton (DWL) on the Reliquiae Baxterianae (Oxford UP, 5 vols)
Dr Johanna Harris (Exeter) and Dr Alison Searle (Sydney) on the correspondence of Richard Baxter (Oxford UP, 9 vols)
16:00-16:30 Discussion and Questions
16:30 Convene at a nearby venue (TBC)

Conference fee £10 (£5 students/unwaged), payable on the door. Please register by 31 October 2015 by email to: RichardBaxter400@gmail.com

Thanks to the generosity of the Society for Renaissance Studies, the organisers can contribute to the travel and subsistence costs of a small number of unwaged postgraduate or postdoctoral researchers attending the symposium. If you would like to apply for this funding then please contact the organisers prior to the registration deadline. Details available at: http://www.english.qmul.ac.uk/drwilliams/research/baxter.html

New Critical Studies on Quaker Women: 1650-1800

New Critical Studies on Quaker Women: 1650-1800

The corpus of Quaker women’s history and literature offers one of the most fascinating studies of gender across all centuries and continents. This small group of women pioneers, activists, prophets and writers has often been at the grassroots of revolutionary movements, fuelling and propelling the way for global, monumental change. Yet, there is very little in Quaker historiography that specifically highlights or features the gathered influence of these women. While only a few scholars have analysed early Quaker women’s contributions as spiritual foremothers and visionary leaders (Christine Trevett’s Women and Quakerism, 1991; Phyllis Mack’s Visionary Women, 1992; Rebecca Larson’s Daughters of Light, 1999; and Catie Gill’s Women in the Seventeenth-Century Quaker Community, 2005), there has not been a twenty-first-century compilation of new critical studies on Quaker women. With a central focus on gender, this project seeks to assemble an interdisciplinary body of writers with a shared interest in reassessing early Quaker women, highlighting new discoveries and interpretations about their literary creation, historical landmarks, and transatlantic movements.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Women and the origins of Quakerism (the influence of the earliest women Friends)
  • Feminization of early Quaker religious practices
  • Women’s socio-political positions within Quaker theology and culture
  • Women’s Meetings (as a site of power, autonomy, change)
  • Women and Quaker print culture (vs. the censorship of Second Day Morning Meeting)
  • Manuscript Culture
  • The limited placement of women in early Quaker historiography
  • Women on the margins of QuakerismWomen and the slave trade
  • Martyrology and gender
  • Women and Language
  • Women and Prophetic Performance
  • Religio-political writings by womenAutobiography and “convincement”
  • Dissent and identity studies
  • Women, leadership, and networking
  • Lesser known Quaker women (e.g. Elizabeth Hooten, Martha Simmonds, Mary Fisher, etc.)
  • Women Friends’ influence on other religious sects and communities

Please submit proposals of approximately 500 words, along with a curriculum vita, to: Michele Lise Tarter (tarter@tcnj.edu) and Catie Gill (C.J.Gill@lboro.ac.uk) by October 25, 2015. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

To download a pdf, please click here.