Category Archives: CFP

CFP: Devotional Writing in Print and Manuscript

CALL FOR PAPERS:

‘Devotional Writing in Print and Manuscript in Early Modern England, 1558-1700’

 University of Warwick, Monday 26 June 2017, Ramphal Building

Plenary Speakers:

Emeritus Prof Bernard Capp (Warwick) and Dr Johanna Harris (Exeter)

‘Devotional Writing in Print and Manuscript’ is a major multi-disciplinary conference, hosted by the University of Warwick’s English Department in collaboration with the Centre for the Study of the Renaissance, the Humanities Research Centre and the Early Modern Forum.  Contributions are invited from established scholars and postgraduate students alike.  Publication of a selection of papers is envisioned.

Themes for papers may include (but are not limited to): literary, visual. political, theological, historical, material, musical, polemical or any other treatments of the topics of devotional writing in print or manuscript in the context of reformation-era England.

These may include:

  • Piety of the Household/Neighbourhood
  • Children, Catechism and Memory
  • Temptation/Possession/Conversion Narratives
  • Fasts/Feasts/Thanksgiving Days
  • Prayer Books/Church Books/Book of Sports
  • Psalmody versus Hymnody
  • Playhouses, the Pulpit, and the Theatre of the Word
  • Sick-bed/Death-bed Accounts (ars moriendi)
  • Godly Missives and Communal Correspondences
  • Martyrology/Hagiography
  • Religious Iconography/Graffiti/Objects
  • Biblicism versus Fanaticism
  • Spiritual Manuals and/or Cases of Conscience

Please send abstracts/panel proposals of no more than 300 words for a 20-minute paper (along with a brief biography) by 30 April 2017 to: devotionalwritinginengland@gmail.com.

For more information, see: https://devotionalwritinginprintandmanuscriptinearlymodernengland.com

 

CFP: Prison/exile: Controlled Spaces in Early Modern Europe

Call for Papers: Prison/Exile: Controlled Spaces in Early Modern Europe
10–11 March 2017 | Ertegun House, University of Oxford
 
This conference seeks to explore the relationship between space, identity, and religious belief in early modern Europe, through the correlative yet distinct experiences of imprisonment and exile. The organisers welcome all paper proposals that explore the phenomena of imprisonment and exile in the early modern period, especially those that relate these modalities of control to the complex and evolving religious thought of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe. At a time when incarceration or exile was a distinct possibility, even likelihood, for many of Europe’s innovative thinkers, how did the experience of imprisonment or banishment influence the texts—theological, political, and literary—produced in the early modern period? How did early modern individuals inhabit, conceptualise, and represent “unfree” space? How does the spatial turn help us to investigate the impact of the confines of prison or the exile’s physical separation from their community on the production and development of religious thought? Does imprisonment or exile exaggerate polemical language and heighten sectarian differences, or induce censorship and temper dissenting voices?
 
Keynote lectures will be given by Professor Rivkah Zim (King’s College, London) and Professor Bruce Gordon (Yale University).
 
We invite 20-minute papers, from literary, historical, theological, and interdisciplinary perspectives, on these themes. We are especially interested in papers connecting imprisonment and exile, and in those linking physical spaces with the world of ideas and texts. 
 
Potential topics might include, but are not limited to:
 
– prison writings and literature produced in exile
– the emergence of the prison as a mode of punishment, including responses to the work of Michel Foucault, Norbert Elias, and other theorists
– the utility of the genre of prison writings, alongside considerations of audience, reception, and intention
– spatial confines of imprisonment
– captivity, relationships between captor and captive, cultural issues arising from captivity
– mental and physical separation from community
– distinctions and connections between imprisonment and exile
– monastic prisons
– literary consolation
– literary and figurative conceptualisations of imprisonment and exile
– mental and physical isolation, and afflictions experienced whilst incarcerated
– imprisonment or exile as themes or images in theology and exegesis
 
The organisers, Spencer Weinreich, Chiara Giovanni, and Anik Laferrière, look forward to receiving proposals, particularly from postgraduate students and early career researchers, and are glad to answer any queries. Proposals should include a title and abstract of a maximum of 250 words, and should be sent to prisonexileoxford@gmail.com by 9 January 2017.

Conference – ‘The Rethinking of Religious Belief’

The 2017 conference of the International Society for Intellectual History (ISIH) will take place at the American University in Bulgaria, 30 May – 1 June 2017. The conference is titled ‘The Rethinking of Religious Belief in the Making of Modernity’. Keynote speakers include Wayne Hudson, Michael Hunter, Jonathan Israel, and Lyndal Roper. Proposals for 20-minute individual papers are welcome. Proposals for panels, consisting of three 20-minute papers, are also welcome. Paper and panel proposals are welcome both from ISIH members and scholars who are not members of the Society. The language of the conference is English: all speakers are supposed to deliver their papers in English. Papers and panels may concentrate on any period, region, tradition or discipline relevant to the conference theme. For further details on how to apply through the onine submission form, please visit the conference page on the ISIH website.

Call for Papers – ‘Borders/Boundaries and Religious Otherness: Religion in Travel Writings’

For further information about this conference, to be held at the University of Grenoble Alpes (France), 1-2 December 2016, please click on the following link: http://ilcea4.u-grenoble3.fr/fr/agenda/colloques/appel-a-communication-pour-le-colloque-international-frontieres-et-alterite-religieuse-la-religion-dans-le-recit-de-voyage–285205.kjsp. The deadline for proposing a paper is 15 June 2016.

Call for Papers: The People all Changed: Religion and Society in the 1650s

This event, held at the University of Portsmouth, 15-16 July 2016, is being convened by Dr Fiona McCall and will be of interest to many of our readers. Dr McCall writes:

‘The changes which resulted from the British Civil Wars are often seen as the first modern revolution.  The establishment of a radical protestant regime in 1645, and of the English republic in 1649, were accompanied by profound alterations to the religious, social, cultural, political, financial and legal landscape.   New patterns of consumption and socialisation emerged, along with the first stirrings of a scientific culture.   Some embraced change, in Milton’s words, ‘musing, searching, revolving new notions … trying all things.’  Others were horrified, experiencing these as times of ‘distractions’, madness and trouble, a ‘World Turned Upside Down’.  Historians continue to debate the extent of the social disruption which resulted, and the success or failure of Godly religion.  Yet the consequences and personal experiences of the years which followed the first Civil war are significantly under-researched compared to its causes.  The aim of this conference is to encourage contributions to redress this balance, particularly in relation to social, religious and cultural change (or lack of it) and the general impact on everyday life and on individual experience. The conference is sponsored by funding from the British Academy.  Confirmed keynote speakers are Professor Bernard Capp (University of Warwick) and Dr Angela McShane (Victoria and Albert Museum).’

Call for Papers

The conference is open to scholars at all academic stages. See http://www.port.ac.uk/centre-for-european-and-international-studies-research/events/the-people-all-changed/ for further details.

BSECS 2016: Writing, Religion, and Enlightenment Panel

Call for Papers: Writing, Religion, and Enlightenment panel at BSECS 2016 (St Hugh’s College, Oxford, 6th-8th January 2016)

The focus of this panel is the relationship between writing and religion in the period of the Enlightenment (broadly interpreted). We invite proposals for 20 minute papers on this theme in relation to texts, from the canonical to the unpublished, connected with or produced by different religious denominations and communities (Anglican, Dissenting, Catholic, Jewish, Baptist, Quaker and others). We are open to methodological approaches drawn from different disciplines, but the central concerns of the panel are: i) The ways in which individuals and groups represent and live their religious faith and identity through the reading, writing, and dissemination of texts; and ii) critical analysis of texts that might be termed ‘religious’ with a particular attention to language, form and genre.

Additional questions that the panel might address include, but are not limited to:

  • How were religious genres including hymnody, sermon and prayer conceived of in the period? What differentiates them from genres in the secular tradition?
  • How do religious writers imagine their readers?
  • How can religious texts be situated within the textual landscape of the Enlightenment? And in what ways do they engage with key Enlightenment debates (including, for example, ideas of self and of agency, rationality, and forms of knowledge)?
  • How do eighteenth-century writers validate their religious writing, and on what grounds do they negotiate the internal and external authority of their work?
  • How might we counter claims that religious writing fails to conform to the ideal of the literary?
  • What are the advantages/limitations of seeking to recuperate close reading and form-based criticism as an alternative to the historicist monopoly over the study of religious literature?
  • What can we learn from an investigation of religious writing that might influence our analysis of literary texts more broadly?

This panel represents the latest in a series of events organised by the panel chairs, and suitable papers will be considered for a planned publication comprising a journal special edition on this theme in 2017.

Abstracts of 250 words or fewer should be submitted by midnight on 11th October 2015 to L.I.Davies@soton.ac.uk

Details of the BSECS Annual Conference can be found at http://www.bsecs.org.uk/