Category Archives: Seminar

Dr Williams’s Library 2017 programme

Wednesday 22nd March, 2017 (5:15pm–6:45pm)

‘Behold, how great a fire a little matter kindleth!’: Dissenting Silver in the Collection of Dr Williams’s Library

Dr Helen Clifford, Curator of Swaledale Museum North Yorkshire

Thursday 4th May, 2017 (4:00pm–7:00pm)

Database Launch: GEMMS: The Gateway to Early Modern Manuscript Sermons

Professor Jeanne Shami, Regina

Dr Anne James, Regina

Booking required

Saturday 20th May, 2017 (10:00am–5:00pm)

Conference: Evangelicalism and Dissent

Robert Strivens (London Seminary), ‘Dissent and the Origins of the Evangelical Revival’

Martin Wellings (Wesley Memorial Church, Oxford), ‘Wesleyan Methodism and Dissent’

Timothy Larsen (Wheaton College, Illinois), ‘Congregationalists and Crucicentrism’

John Maiden (Open University), ‘The New Nonconformity’

Booking required

Wednesday 14th June, 2017 (5:15pm–6:45pm)

Professor Ann Hughes, Keele

Title to be announced.

Further details: conference@dwlib.co.uk

QMUL CRLE Seminar – Veronica O’Mara – ‘Saints’ Lives for East Anglian Nuns: From C15 to C18′

All are welcome to this third seminar of the Centre for Religion and Literature in English at Queen Mary University of London:

Time: Wednesday 6 July 2016, 5.15-6.45pm
Place: Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Westfield Way, Queen Mary University of London, E1 4NS

Dr Veronica O’Mara (Hull), ‘Saints’ Lives for East Anglian Nuns: From the Medieval Period to the Eighteenth Century’

This paper will focus on a collection of twenty-two Middle English saints’ lives from the end of the fifteenth century that are currently being edited by Virginia Blanton (University of Missouri-Kansas City) and Veronica O’Mara (University of Hull). These lives, all but two of which concern women, are a complex mixture of native English and international saints whose sources may be partly identified. They survive in a single manuscript that was owned in the eighteenth century by a recusant family in Norfolk, a family that sent its daughters to be professed on the continent in the post-Dissolution period. This unique collection, which may be associated with a range of East Anglian convents and was at one time owned by a member of the royal family, provides links between medieval Catholic England and eighteenth-century England, between Norfolk and the capital, between Europe and England.

QMUL CRLE Seminar – Cecilia Muratori – ‘Jacob Böhme in Christopher Walton’s Theosophical Library’

Here are details of the second seminar of the Centre for Religion and Literature in English at Queen Mary University of London:

Time: Wednesday 1 June 2016, 5.15-6.45pm
Place: Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Westfield Way, Queen Mary University of London, E1 4NS

Dr Cecilia Muratori (Warwick), ‘ “Public Highway to the Perfect Regeneration”: Jacob Böhme in Christopher Walton’s Theosophical Library’

The theosophical library of Christopher Walton (1809-1877) contains many books by and on the German mystical philosopher Jacob Böhme (1575-1624), alongside notes on the reception of Böhme in England and even drawings to elucidate his complex work. Walton built up his theosophic collection (amounting to around 1000 items) by purchasing books at public auctions as well as from the heirs of one of the most famous English readers of Böhme, William Law (1686-1761). With the intention of keeping the collection open to the public, Walton’s theosophic library was donated to Dr Williams’s Library at the time of Walton’s death, and in fulfilment of his wish it was (and still remains) catalogued separately. This paper will discuss the aims of this section of Walton’s collection, showing that it was designed both to assist with interpreting Böhme, and to serve as an aid for English speakers for whom Böhme’s original writings were inaccessible. The paper will also show that this collection sheds light on the reception of Böhme in England in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, with special regard to the networks of both English and German readers of Böhme that operated in London.

QMUL CRLE seminar – Alison Searle – ‘Spirit and Body in C17 English Nonconformist Women’s Writing’

All are welcome to the inaugural seminar of the Centre for Religion and Literature in English at Queen Mary University of London:
Time: Wednesday 1 June 2016, 5.15-6.45pm
Place: Lock-Keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, Westfield Way, Queen Mary University of London, E1 4NS

Dr Alison Searle (Sydney), ‘Spirit and Body in Seventeenth-Century English Nonconformist Women’s Writing’

This paper will examine the spiritual and corporeal experience of nonconformist women in seventeenth-century England as recorded in their diaries, letters, biographies and prophecies, focusing specifically on the role attributed to the Holy Spirit. Subjects will include Briget Cooke, Mary Franklin and Anne Wentworth amongst others.

Dr Williams’s Library Seminar, 16 March 2016

Readers are reminded of the details of the next Dr Williams’s Library seminar:

Valerie Smith (University of Kent), ‘Theology and the Identity of Rational Dissent c.1770-1800′

Wednesday 16 March 2016, Dr Williams’s Library, 5:15-6:45

To view a poster containing further details of this event and the other lectures and seminars in the series, please click on the link below:

DWL Seminar – 16 March 2016

NEH Summer Seminar Announcement: ‘Postsecular Studies and the Rise of the English Novel, 1719-1897’

Lori Branch and Mark Knight are delighted to be co-directing a 4-week 2016 National Endowment for the Humanities summer seminar in Iowa City on ‘Postsecular Studies and the Rise of the English Novel 1719-1897.’ Examining the role that religion and secularization play in the rise of the novel, the seminar has places for 16 scholars (two of whom may be graduate students), and will run from 11 July  – 5 August 2016. During the seminar, participants will meet together to discuss common readings and spend the rest of the time working on their own related research projects. Further information about the seminar, including the application guidelines and the NEH eligibility criteria, can be found at http://www.uiowa.edu/postsecular-novel/. You can also contact Andrew Williams (andrew-williams@uiowa.edu or postsecular-novel@uiowa.edu).

Dr Williams’s Library Lecture and Seminar Series

All readers are invited to attend this year’s seminars and lectures at Dr Williams’s Library (Gordon Square, London), which will be as follows:

Wednesday 20th January, 2016 5:15pm–6:45pm: Seminar: Philip Henry and the restoration of the Church of England, 1660-61. (David Wykes, Dr Williams’s Library)
 
Wednesday 17th February, 2016 5:15pm–6:45pm: Lecture: Sion College for the dissenters? Library rivalry in early 18th-century London (Giles Mandelbrote, Lambeth Palace Library)
 
Wednesday 16th March, 2016 5:15pm–6:45pm: Seminar: 
Theology and the Identity of Rational Dissent c.1770-1800 (Valerie Smith, University of Kent)
 
Wednesday 20th April, 2016 5:15pm–6:45pm: Seminar: ‘Not a church, but a conventicle of schismatics’: Conformity and Nonconformity in the State Church of the 1650s (Rebecca Warren, University of Kent)
 
Wednesday 15th June, 2016 5:15pm–6:45pm: Lecture: Samuel Fancourt: A Dissenter and his Public Circulating Library (Keith Manley, Institute of Historical Research, University of London)

Seminar in Dissenting Studies

DR WILLIAMS’S CENTRE FOR DISSENTING STUDIES

Seminar in Dissenting Studies, the Lecture Hall, Dr Williams’s Library, 14 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0AR. All are welcome.

Wednesday 17 June 2015 5.15 to 6.45 pm

Timothy Whelan (Georgia Southern), ‘Mary Hays and Henry Crabb Robinson: Reconstructing a “Female Biography”’ 

Mary Hays has received considerable attention in the past two decades, through an edition of her correspondence, new editions of her novels and other prose, and important biographical studies, including Gina Luria Walker’s Mary Hays (1759-1843): The Growth of a Woman’s Mind (2006). Hays was herself concerned to record the lives of gifted women. Yet her own life history has been unnecessarily truncated and inaccurately presented owing to the absence of one critical resource: the life writings of Henry Crabb Robinson. Robinson met Hays in 1799 and, despite the sixteen-year difference in their ages, the friendship continued until her death in 1843. Robinson’s diary makes over 170 references to Hays, of which only seven have been published. Together with a valuable letter on Hays by Robinson to Catherine Clarkson in early 1800 concerning Hays’s affair with Charles Lloyd, these references provide an extensive genealogical record of Hays’s family after 1800 and their important involvement with Baptists and Unitarians, as well as Hays’s introduction to a vibrant group of Dissenting women from Leicester and their connections in the West Country that intersected at the same time with Godwin and his circle. Though Walker has referred to Hays’s life after 1806 as “buried”, Robinson’s accounts reveal something quite different, a woman who viewed herself and her life from within the prism of religious Dissent; a woman devoted to her family and their connections through marriage with several prominent Dissenting families (all friends of Robinson); a woman who held to many of the same opinions on religion, politics, and women’s rights she had first espoused in the 1790s; and who passed these ideals on to her niece and namesake, Matilda Mary Hays (1820-97), feminist and translator of George Sand.

Timothy Whelan is Professor of English at Georgia Southern University. He is Senior Visiting Fellow of the Dr Williams’s Centre for Dissenting Studies, and currently Distinguished Visiting Fellow at Queen Mary University of London. His monograph, Other British Voices: Women, Poetry, and Religion, 1766-1840, is in press with Palgrave. It builds on his 8-volume edition of Nonconformist Women Writers 1720-1840 (Pickering & Chatto, 2011). He has published many other critical editions and articles including, most recently, ‘Wilhelm Benecke, Crabb Robinson, and “rational faith”, 1819-1837’; he is general editor of the forthcoming Oxford University Press edition of the Reminiscences and Diary of Henry Crabb Robinson.

Speaker’s profile: www.english.qmul.ac.uk/drwilliams/people/whelan.html

For more information about the Seminar in Dissenting Studies contact James Vigus (j.vigus@qmul.ac.uk) or see www.english.qmul.ac.uk/drwilliams/events/current.html

Seminar in Dissenting Studies

DR WILLIAMS’S CENTRE FOR DISSENTING STUDIES

The Lecture Hall

Dr Williams’s Library, 14 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0AR. 

All are welcome.
Wednesday 22 April 2015 5.15 to 6.45 pm

David Hayton (Ulster University)

‘Dissenters at the polls in Ireland, 1692–1760’

The social and political profile of Dissent in eighteenth-century Ireland was shaped by the heavy immigration of Presbyterians into Ulster during the preceding hundred years, and especially in the 1690s. This created a situation in which Dissenters constituted a majority of Protestants in some northern counties, and a substantial minority in others, while in the other three provinces they were dispersed and, with the exception of Dublin, unimportant politically. The concentration of Dissenters in Ulster aroused fear and antagonism among the clergy and laity of the established church, and led to the introduction for the first time in Ireland in 1703 of a sacramental test, which applied to crown and municipal office-holders and had an immediate effect on Presbyterians in some parliamentary boroughs. It is often stated, erroneously, that Dissenters were disenfranchised by the Test, but this was not true either in theory or in practice. In Ulster, however, the effect of the Test was twofold, to weaken Presbyterian representation among the social elite, many of whom began to conform in consequence, but to maintain a sense of grievance which kept Presbyterians together in some constituencies as a coherent political force. This paper will try to determine the reality of Dissenting electoral influence in the half-century after the passage of the Test, and its importance in providing the backbone of the ‘patriot’ movement of the 1750s and 1760s, which paved the way for political reform

Continue reading Seminar in Dissenting Studies

Seminar in Dissenting Studies

Seminar in Dissenting Studies, the Lecture Hall, Dr Williams’s Library, 14 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0AR. All are welcome.

Wednesday 11 February 2015 5.15 to 6.45 pm

 Anthony Ossa-Richardson (Queen Mary University of London), ‘Dissenting Gospels: Edward Harwood’s A Liberal Translation of the New Testament

This paper focuses on Edward Harwood’s English translation of the New Testament, published in 1768. The translation has long incurred mockery and opprobrium for its stylistic eccentricity, since it attempts to mimic the polite literature of the mid-eighteenth century, an incongruous effect for any used to the solemn rhythms of the King James Version. Behind this facade, however, lay a rigorous effort to refigure the Bible according to the principles of Arian theology, and Harwood’s contemporaries, both in Britain and on the Continent, were fully aware of this strategy. This paper, then, situates the translation against (1) Harwood’s wider intellectual activity, including his theological works and his textual criticism, (2) dissenting biblical scholarship of the eighteenth century, and (3) his hostile readers, who included both orthodox critics from Scotland and the Netherlands, and the English Socinian writer William Hazlitt, Sr.

 Anthony Ossa-Richardson is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at Queen Mary University of London. His primary research interest is early modern (c. 1600-1800) intellectual history, including religion, hermeneutics, literature and philosophy. He has published The Devil’s Tabernacle: The Pagan Oracles in Early Modern Thought (2013), and is now working towards a monograph on the history of the concept of ambiguity in a range of fields from the Renaissance to the twentieth century.

Speaker’s email: a.ossa-richardson@qmul.ac.uk

Webpage: http://www.sed.qmul.ac.uk/staff/ossarichardsona.html

For more information about the Seminar in Dissenting Studies contact James Vigus (j.vigus@qmul.ac.uk) or see: http://www.english.qmul.ac.uk/drwilliams/events/current.html