All posts by Anne Page

Dissenting Experience, Experiencing Dissent: Registration

There are still a few places left for the first of our conferences at Dr Williams’s Library on Saturday 9 November 2013. You can download the complete programme here.

Speakers are: Michael Davies, Crawford Gribben, Ann Hughes, N. H. Keeble, Kathleen Lynch, Chad van Dixhoorn, and Elliot Vernon.

© Trustees of Dr Williams's Library
© Trustees of Dr Williams’s Library

These three one-day conferences, a partnership between the Aix-Marseille Research Centre on the English-Speaking World and Dr Williams’s Centre for Dissenting Studies will take place in early November, in 2013, 2014, and 2015. They  will explore the religious and social experiences of Independent and Baptist churches and their members during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Although the focus will remain primarily on what could be termed the ‘gathered churches’, the conferences will also offer opportunities to explore other aspects of the experience of dissent: from, for example, the perspective of Presbyterians and Quakers. This year is on “Ministers and their congregations”, while we’ll look at the “Variety of dissenting expression” next year with speakers on Church records, diaries, poetry, letters and entring books.

To register, send an e-mail to Anne Page with your title, affiliation, postal address and dietary requirements:  anne.page@univ-amu.frRegistration is free and a buffet lunch will be served at the Library.

Dissenting Academies Online: Virtual Library System (Dr Williams’s Centre for Dissenting Studies)

The Virtual Library System was relaunched in September 2013 with the addition of the Catalogue of the Library of the Lancashire Independent College, Manchester (1885) and details of the 2,500 surviving books from the Northern Congregational College, formed in 1958 from the amalgamation of Lancashire Independent College and Yorkshire United Independent College. The books, dating from the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries, are unusually rich in provenance and evidence of use, both institutional and private, the latter including fascinating examples of the everyday reader–men and women who owned only a handful of books and whose annotations are the only evidence of their interaction with them. The VLS for the first time includes high resolution images of the title pages and marks of ownership for these books, which are held at The John Rylands Library, The University of Manchester. The details of the previous owners, both private and institutional, are included in the fully searchable database. For access and further information see: http://vls.english.qmul.ac.uk/

 The project ‘Private Books for Educational Use – the Formation of the Northern Congregational College Library’, funded by the AHRC, was directed by Professor Isabel Rivers (Queen Mary University of London) and Dr David Wykes (Dr Williams’s Library, London), and implemented by Dr Benjamin Bankhurst and Dr Rachel Eckersley, research assistants, and Dr Dmitri Iourinski, technical assistant, with the advice of Ed Potten (Cambridge University Library), principal consultant.

A New Edition of the Bunyan Church Book, 1656-1710

By Michael Davies, University of Liverpool

The purpose of this edition (currently in preparation, and forthcoming from Oxford University Press in 2015) is to provide literary scholars and historians, as well as students and general readers, with a scholarly yet accessible annotated edition of A Booke Containing a Record of the Acts of a Congregation of Christ in and about Bedford: the manuscript record of the Bedford congregation’s life during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

IMG_0529 - Version 2

Who the congregation’s members were, how they were received and disciplined, how they survived strife and harassment, and what defined their ecclesiological principles and practices are all revealed in fascinating detail by this remarkable document.  This edition will include the Church Book’s record of meetings from 1656, when they begin to be noted, to 1710, when an off-shoot congregation was formed out of the Bedford church and established – on good terms – at Gamlingay, Cambridgeshire.  During this period, John Bunyan famously served as the congregation’s preacher and pastor, witnessing significant crises and developments both within the Bedford church and for Restoration Nonconformity more generally.

Continue reading A New Edition of the Bunyan Church Book, 1656-1710

The Lucy Hutchinson Conference

Make sure you visit the website of the Centre for Early Modern Studies (University of Oxford) for details about the Lucy Hutchinson Conference, to be held at St Edmund Hall, Oxford, on Thursday 28 november 2013. You can register online until November 21st.

The new edition of Hutchinson’s collected works is supported by a website (with, among other things a bibliography of John Owen by Mark Burden) and a blog. The first volume, edited by Reid Barbour and David Norbrook was launched in February 2012 (see our Publications page).

9780199247363

Ucy_hutchinson

“Lucy Hutchinson is well known to seventeenth-century historians and literary scholars as the author of Memoirs of the Life of Colonel Hutchinson, a classic biography which sets the momentous life of her husband, a committed Puritan, republican and regicide, against the wider backdrop of the English Civil War and Restoration. This work, and a compelling though fragmentary autobiography, have been more or less continually in print since their publication from manuscript in 1806. Only recently, however, has the scale and range of her interests been recognized.

Continue reading The Lucy Hutchinson Conference

The ‘presbyterianism’ of Richard Heyrick

By James Mawdesley, The University of Sheffield

N.B. References in brackets refer to The Minutes and Papers of the Westminster Assembly 1643-1652, ed. Chad van Dixhoorn (5 vols., Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012).

I have recently been fortunate enough to have access to Chad van Dixhoorn’s new edition of the minutes of the Westminster Assembly, and it struck me how over the next few years, it will be interesting to see what use scholars make of the minutes, and what details lie within a primary source which had previously only been utilised in manuscript form by the most dedicated of researchers.

Manchester Cathedral (the former collegiate church), with Heyrick's memorial brass
Manchester Cathedral (the former collegiate church), with Heyrick’s memorial brass

The intention of this brief blog post is to highlight a small example of what details can be found within the minutes, and how the minutes might be used to adapt our understanding of the careers of individual clerics. Richard Heyrick had been appointed in 1635 as the warden of the Manchester collegiate church, and is well known as one of the leading lights of the classical presbyterian system which was established in Lancashire in 1646 (the year in which episcopacy was abolished). Within the Lancashire province, the Manchester classis (under Heyrick’s watch) continued to function until the summer of 1660, just after the restoration of Charles II to the throne. Though he did not participate in the Westminster Assembly to the same extent as his fellow member for Lancashire, Charles Herle (the rector of Winwick), he was nonetheless a relatively regular attendee of its debates. It was during these debates that Heyrick made two particularly interesting contributions.

Continue reading The ‘presbyterianism’ of Richard Heyrick

The Richard L. Greaves Award to Kathleen Lynch

On 15 August 2013, Kathleen Lynch received the award from David Gay, chairman of the  selection committee (2010-2013), for her monograph, Protestant Autobiography in the Seventeenth-Century Anglophone Worldpublished in 2012 by Oxford University Press. 

Lynch

The Richard L. Greaves Award is presented triennially by the International John Bunyan Society for an outstanding book on the history, literature, thought, practices, and legacy of English Protestantism to 1700.

A special commendation went to Tim Cooper for his John Owen, Richard Baxter and the Formation of Nonconformity (Ashgate, 2011).

 

CFP: Early Modern Women, Religion, and the Body

This is a CFP forwarded by Rachel Adcock (Loughborough) that might be of interest to those working on dissenting women:

22-23 July 2014, Loughborough University.

Plenary speakers: Professor Mary Fissell (Johns Hopkins) and Dr Katharine Hodgkin (University of East London). With public lecture by Alison Weir (evening of 22 July, Martin Hall Theatre): ‘“The Prince expected in due season”: The Queen’s First Duty’

This two-day conference will explore the response of early modern texts to the relationship between religion and female bodily health. Scholars have long observed that understandings of the flesh and the spirit were inextricably intertwined in the early modern period, and that women’s writings or writings about women often explored this complex relationship. For instance, how did early modern women understand pain, illness, and health in a religious framework, and was this different to the understanding of those around them? Did women believe that their bodies were sinful? And were male and female religious experiences different because they took place in different bodies? Continue reading CFP: Early Modern Women, Religion, and the Body

IJBS Conference: last days to register

Registration for the 7th Triennal Conference of the International John Bunyan Society (12-16 August 2013) will close on 31 July 2013. The theme this year is ‘John Bunyan : Conscience, History and Justice’ and Nigel Smith is hosting it in Princeton.

The exciting programme includes over 30 papers and plenaries by N. H. Keeble (Stirling), Laura Knoppers (Penn. State), Paul C. H. Lim (Vanderbilt) and Cynthia Wall (Virginia).

Click here for the provisional programme and visit the website of IJBS for more details.

A bit of publicity!

Hypotheses.org, which we are using for this blog, was mentioned at the JISC Collections/OAPEN Foundation international conference at the British Library last week (on open access to HSS monographs). Plenary speaker Jean-Claude Guédon singled it out as one of the exciting tools for scholars to communicate about their respective research programmes and associate director of OpenEdition, Pierre Mounier, reminded us that their infrastructures are not just ‘for the French’. Indeed! We hope that colleagues around the world will take this opportunity to explore Hypotheses, as we think they’ve provided us with a wonderful solution for sharing our thoughts on British dissent.

Early-modern dissent and visual culture

As Michael, Joel and I are little by little filling up the pages of this blog, we realize how little suitable material there seems to be out there to use to illustrate it. Of course, portraits of ministers are not exactly lacking, nor are manuscript pages that institutions would allow us to use for academic purposes, or engravings of later chapels, but we’re not making huge progress with early material, and, perhaps unsurprisingly, with crowd scenes.

David Wykes has dug out the wonderful title-page of The Pathway to Eternal Life: Being the Last Sermon of that Eminent Divine Mr T. Williams, that he has kindly allowed us to reproduce here (see our ‘Events’ section, it’s been trimmed as we’re using it for publicity material for our forthcoming conference). Collage (London Metropolitan Archives) has a good engraving of the inside of Salters’ Hall (1720), which you might well want to check out if you don’t know it already; it’s n°6311 in their collection.

The French ‘Quaqueresse qui préche’ was apparently engraved by Bernard Picart around c.1723 and is in the public domain.

AssemblyOfQuakersI know I should probably know more about this picture and yet I don’t! Can anybody out there help us  with early-modern representations of dissent? We’d particularly like to change the default header that you can see above. Do you know anything that could be suitable and is there any work being conducted in the field, perhaps by art historians?

As talking about pictures makes me think of dissenting architecture, I’ve added a link in the relevant section to the Historic Chapel Trust. This is not a charity I know, but some of their restoration projects are gorgeous. I love browsing through the volumes of Christopher Stell’s Inventory and I’m just sorry such labours of love are hardly available outside major research libraries.