CFP: Representing Dissent in the Long Eighteenth Century

Capture d’écran 2014-11-25 à 16.58.28

"Representing Dissent in the Long Eighteenth Century"

A Regional Day Conference of the International John Bunyan Society organized by W. R. Owens and David Walker in association with the University of Bedfordshire and Northumbria University will take place at the University of Bedfordshire, Bedford Campus, on Friday 10 April 2015.

This conference is open to anyone interested in Bunyan and in the ways in which Dissent and Dissenters were represented during the period from about 1660 through to the early nineteenth century. The term ‘represented’ may be taken to include self-representation and representation by others in various forms of expression and communication, including, for example, literature, art, the theatre, news media, high and popular culture, sermons, and political discourse and propaganda. Please send a title and very brief summary of a 20-minute paper – no later than 1 February 2015 – to: Bob Owens (bob.owens@beds.ac.uk) and David Walker (david5.walker@northumbria.ac.uk).

You can download the flier and the registration details here.

Posted in CFP, Conference | Leave a comment

Dissenting Experience: Years 2 and 3

Many thanks to all the speakers and delegates at Dissenting Experience 2nd annual conference ('Varieties of Dissenting Expression', 8 November 2014, Dr Williams's Library, London) and to our institutional partners: The Institut Universitaire de France, LERMA (Aix-Marseille University), Dr Williams's Library, Dr Williams's Centre for Dissenting Studies and the University of Liverpool.

© Trustees of Dr Williams's Library

© Trustees of Dr Williams's Library 

 

For the list of delegates, click here.

Special thanks to Jenna Townend (Loughborough) and her supervisor, Dr Rachel Adcock, for a very nice review of the conference on 'My Early Modern World' (and sorry for the early start)!

If you are a doctoral student with an interest in Dissenting studies, don't hesitate to get in touch and 'register an interest', and we will keep you informed about our activities.

The third annual conference will take place on Saturday 14 November 2015.  Confirmed speakers include

  • Dr Mark Burden (Portsmouth) on early Dissenting academies
  • Prof. John Coffey (Leicester),The problem of denominational labelling (1640-1672)’
  • Prof. Jeremy Gregory (Manchester) on the Church of England
  • Dr Ariel Hessayon (Goldsmiths University of London) on the Philadelphians
  • Prof. Mark Knights (Warwick) on corruption
  • Dr Kate Peters (Cambridge) on the Quakers
  • Dr Grant Tapsell (Oxford), ‘The View from Lambeth’
Posted in Posts | Leave a comment

News from EMoDiR

EMoDiR is advertising two events of interest for Dissenting Experience:

26-29 November 2014, Menaggio, workshop Villa Vigoni: 'Les dissidences religieuses en Europe à l’époque moderne : des constructions en mouvement (liens, langages, objets)'

Org. Adelisa Malena, Sophie Houdard and Xenia von Tippelskirch http://www.emodir.net/projects/villa-vigoni

26–28 March 2015, Berlin, The Sixty-First Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America

5 EMoDiR-Panels (organized by Stefano Villani) on Early Modern Religious Dissent and Radicalism have been accepted. Check the programme for further details: http://www.rsa.org/?page=2015Berlin

With the participation of Alessandro Arcangeli, Federico Barbierato, Silvia Berti, Manuela Bragagnolo, Peter Burschel, Christiana Facchini, Massimo Firpo, Monika Frohnapfel, Umberto Grassi, Tamar Herzig, Ariel Hessayon, Sünne Juterczenka, Simone Maghenzani, Adelisa Malena, Justin Meggitt, Francesco Ronco, Moshe Sluhovsky, Giovanni Tarantino, Xenia von Tippelskirch, Anne-Charlott Trepp, Stefano Villani.

Posted in Posts | Leave a comment

Dr Williams's Centre for Dissenting Studies 2015 Conference

Dissent and the Representation of War

The eleventh annual one-day conference of the Dr Williams’s Centre for Dissenting Studies will take place on

Saturday 16 May 2015, Dr Williams's Library, 14 Gordon Square WC1H 0AR

Speakers

Brycchan Carey (Kingston University)
Mary-Ann Constantine (University of Wales)
Stephen Conway (UCL)
Rémy Duthille (Université Bordeaux Montaigne)
Karen Racine (University of Guelph)

For more information, see http://www.english.qmul.ac.uk/drwilliams/events/c2015.html

For Dissenters in the First World War, see also below, the Friends of Dr WIlliams's Library Annual Lecture on 13 November 2014, http://fodwllectures.wordpress.com

Posted in Posts | Leave a comment

Dissenting Studies Seminar Series

The 2015 programme is available from the website of Dr Williams's Centre for Dissenting Studies, http://www.english.qmul.ac.uk/drwilliams/events/current.html.

The seminar meets monthly on Wednesdays from January to July (excepting May) from 5.15 to 6.45 pm in the Lecture Hall, Dr Williams's Library, 14 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0AR. All are welcome.

1. 14 January 2015
‘Writing the Lives of Dissent: Community, Biography, and Historiography in Late Eighteenth-Century Rational Dissent’
Felicity James (Leicester)

2. 11 February 2015
‘Dissenting Gospels: Edward Harwood's A Liberal Translation of the New Testament
Anthony Ossa-Richardson (Queen Mary)

3. 11 March 2015
‘John Wood Oman, the Prophet of Westminster’
Fleur Houston (Macclesfield)

4. 22 April 2015
'Dissenters at the polls in Ireland, 1692-1760'
David Hayton (Queen’s University Belfast)

5. 17 June 2015
‘Mary Hays and Henry Crabb Robinson: Reconstructing a "Female Biography"’
Timothy Whelan (Georgia Southern)

 6. 8 July 2015
‘Dissenting lives in dissenting records: reading the manuscript Church books’
Anne Dunan-Page (Aix-Marseilles)

Posted in Posts | Leave a comment

Dissenting Experience gets 5,000€ grant

Dissenting Experience has been awarded a €5,000 'workshop grant' from the School of Humanities at Aix-Marseille University. The one-day workshop will take place at Dr Williams's Library, on 7th November 2014.

Capture d’écran 2014-10-19 à 14.52.20

A panel of international experts and advisors from France, Britain, the United States and Italy will meet to discuss the future of the project, and particularly the publication of an inventory of British Church records, along the lines of those produced for the French Churches (by Raymond Mentzer) and the New-England Churches, part of the Hidden Histories project at the Congregational Library (Boston).

Posted in Posts | Leave a comment

New England Church Records make front page of NY Times

The New York Times recently gave pride of place on its front page to an ongoing search to recover New England's colonial church records. (You can view the article here.) The effort is led by James F. Cooper, Jr of Oklahoma State University and Margaret Bendroth, executive director of the Congregational Library in Boston, and is part of their larger 'New England's Hidden Histories' project.

Unlike most British dissenting records, which were brought into various archives over time or into county record offices during the 1960s, many of New England's colonial-era church records remain in the hands of local churches. They were famously cataloged in the 1960s by Harold F. Worthley, former librarian and executive director of the Congregational Library in Boston. After three years and 28,000 miles of travel he produced his famous 716-page 'Worthley Inventory' of early congregational church records. But now, over 50 years on, many have gone missing.

Drs Bendroth and Cooper are recreating Worthley's travels and rummaging through church closets, file cabinets, drawers, and safety deposit boxes in hopes of finding and preserving these valuable records. Their aim is to persuade churches to protect their past by permanently loaning these records to the Congregational Library in Boston, where they can be protected and restored.

They are also making the records available to the public. Increasing numbers of these records can be found digitized and transcribed on the Library's 'New England's Hidden Histories' website. The website (found here) is an invaluable source for exploring colonial religion.

It is a fascinating project that is drawing considerable attention (the Washington Post covered the story last year). But it also provides an interesting look into some of the challenges and opportunities historians have in collecting and publishing non-state records.

Posted in Posts | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Friends of Dr Williams's Library 2014 Lecture

The 2014 Lecture will be delivered at 5.30pm on 13 November 2014 in the Lecture Hall, Dr Williams’s Library, 14 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0AR.

All are welcome. To book a place, please email conference@dwlib.co.uk.

‘Revisiting Religion and the British Soldier in the First World War’

by Dr Michael Snape (University of Birmingham)

The significance of religion for the British soldier of 1914-1918 has traditionally been downplayed, and even discounted, in the historiography and popular mythology of the First World War. However, more recent research has tended to highlight the importance of personal faith and the role of religious agencies in the British experience of the war. Going further than the case of Great Britain, and beyond the years of the war itself, this lecture examines patterns of religiosity in the British army, correlates them with the evidence of other armed forces and other conflicts, and reassesses the nature and significance of religion for the British soldier throughout the ordeal of the First World War.

For more information about the Lecturer, click here.

For more information about the Friends of Dr Willliams's Library Annual Lectures and how to order printed copies, click here.

Posted in Posts | Leave a comment

Dissenting Experience, Experiencing Dissent

There are still a few places available for the 'Dissenting Experience' Conference at Dr Williams's Library on 8th November 2014. See the full post below for details of registration and the complete programme here.

The conference examines the wealth and variety of written materials, both in print and from archival sources, related to the experience of dissent across a wide spectrum of genres: from surviving gathered-church records and church books in Old and New England to letters and correspondence, poetry, and dissenting activities in the book trade. The conference will explore the methodological challenges and possibilities of using such sources to explore how the dissenting experience was documented and communicated, as well as to assess their value in the literary history of dissent and the writing of its collective history. This is the second in a series of three annual events exploring the collective experience of the dissenting churches in the period 1600-1800.

Posted in Posts | Leave a comment

Baxter Workshop at Dr Williams's Library

Workshop on the Reliquiae Baxterianae Project

Wednesday 10 September 2014, Dr Williams's Library

For more information, visit, http://www.english.qmul.ac.uk/drwilliams/events/w2014.html

Following the presentation on the project to edit Richard Baxter’s Reliquiae Baxterianae given at the 2008 workshop on Baxter organised by Dr Alison Searle and the 2011 lecture on ‘Richard Baxter, John Owen and the Reliquiae Baxterianae’ delivered by Dr Tim Cooper to mark the public launch of this AHRC-funded project, at this workshop the editors will outline the shape of the edition’s current draft and their developing understanding of the process of the text’s composition and its publication in 1696. A draft of the full edition has now been completed. They will seek the advice and suggestions of participants on unresolved and outstanding questions, and will invite comments and queries on editorial and other issues that have arisen in the course of the work.

 Attendance at the workshop is free of charge, but advance registration is essential for catering purposes. If you wish to attend, please email Professor Neil Keeble, n.h.keeble@stir.ac.uk (noting any special dietary requirements) by 31 August.

Posted in Posts | Leave a comment

A new copy of the 1692 Bunyan folio

We can gain a remarkable insight into the use of Bunyan’s works thanks to a copy of the 1692 folio that has just been donated to the Angus Library and Archive, Regent’s Park College, Oxford, by the Faringdon Baptist Church, in Berkshire.

While working in that Library, I was astonished to be shown what I believe is the only chained copy of the folio in existence. A portion of the rusty chain is still attached to the book, and a fly-leaf note, bearing the name of Philip Farmer, describes how the book was to be used in its original home :

This book was given by Phillip ffarmer to the Church of Christ meeting at their meeting house in Westbrook at ffaringdon, Constituted of such only as are baptized upon profession of their faith; to abide fixed in their meeting house for the use of all such whether members or hearers as shall resort thither at convinient seasons to read in it or hear any part of it read; Never to be moved from their present meeting house so long as they or their succcessours of the same faith and order shall possess and use the same for their meeting house; and if ever that church so constituted shall remove to another meeting place or be [letters deleted] divided, it is the will of the donor that the greatest number of such members as afores[ai]d that shall hold together shall possess and enjoy this book for common use as aforesaid This is declared by the donor the first day of ffebruary anno dom[in]j 1711

Phillip ffarmer

Witness. Tho: Langley

This is a unique document, describing how the Bunyan folio was to be permanently kept in the meeting house, for all those wishing to read it, or be read to from it, when stepping into the building. The volume does not possess the frontispiece, the list of subscribers, or the index dedication.

Faringdon Baptist Church, Bromsgrove face, http://www.geograph.org.uk © Roger Templeman, CC BY-SA 2.0

Faringdon Baptist Church, Bromsgrove face, http://www.geograph.org.uk © Roger Templeman, CC BY-SA 2.0

A 19th-century loose sheet inserted in the volume, simply entitled ‘Baptist Church, Faringdon,’ reveals the full contents of a second fly-leaf, which is unfortunately torn. The text runs: 'A book of Bunyan’s works, originally presented to the Church in the year 1711, by Philip Farmer, and removed by Thomas Mace to prevent it being stolen in the year 1761, was restored by Mr. J. Broad, of Reading, May 21st 1888, particulars of each circumstances being written on the fly-lead of the book, now chained to [an] antique oak lectern in its original position in the Chapel'.

The Angus Library and Archive now possesses three copies of the folio, whose editorial history might still yield some surprises. For those unfamiliar with their wonderful records, see their website, http://theangus.rpc.ox.ac.uk

 With many thanks to Emma Walsh and Emily Burgoyne.

Posted in Features, Posts | Leave a comment

Matthew Henry: The Bible, Prayer, and Piety

The University of Chester, 14-16 July 2014.

Capture d’écran 2014-07-13 à 16.37.43'To commemorate the tercentenary of the death of Matthew Henry (22 June 1714) and his 25-year ministry in Chester (1687–1712), the University of Chester, in collaboration with Chester Cathedral Library and the University of Manchester, is holding an interdisciplinary conference 14th–16th July 2014 to bring together historians, biblical scholars, and theologians to explore the work, context, and legacy of Matthew Henry, especially as it relates to his engagement with and use of Scripture. With keynote lectures from Prof. Clyde Binfield, Dr Ligon Duncan, Dr David Wykes, and Prof. Jeremy Gregory, this conference will not only offer a fresh opportunity to appreciate Henry’s ministry within the local context of Chester, it will also evaluate Henry in a wider historical context, and consider his contribution to the interpretation of the Bible in the early 18th century and its legacy up to the present day.'

For more information and registration, see http://www.chester.ac.uk/node/21521

Posted in Posts | Leave a comment

Dissenting Experience, Experiencing Dissent: registration

YEAR 2: Varieties of Dissenting Expression 

Saturday 8 November 2014, Dr Williams's Library

You can download the flyer here. You can download the conference poster here. 

Speakers are: Margaret Bendroth, Francis F. Bremer, James F. Cooper, Joel Halcomb, Nicholas McDowell, Jason McElligott, Johanna Harris, George Southcombe, Bob Wordsworth.

© Trustees of Dr Williams's Library

© Trustees of Dr Williams's Library 

 

 

This one-day conference, organised by the Centre for the English-Speaking World of Aix-Marseille Université in association with the Dr Williams’s Centre for Dissenting Studies and the University of Liverpool, focuses on the forms of dissenting expression available to dissenters and their congregations, on both sides of the Atlantic, throughout the seventeenth century. The conference examines the wealth and variety of written materials, both in print and from archival sources, related to the experience of dissent across a wide spectrum of genres: from surviving gathered-church records and church books in Old and New England to letters and correspondence, poetry, and dissenting activities in the book trade. The conference will explore the methodological challenges and possibilities of using such sources to explore how the dissenting experience was documented and communicated, as well as to assess their value in the literary history of dissent and the writing of its collective history. This is the second in a series of three annual events exploring the collective experience of the dissenting churches in the period 1600-1800.

To register, send an e-mail to Anne Page with your title, affiliation, postal address and dietary requirements:  anne.page@univ-amu.frRegistration is free and a buffet lunch will be served at the Library. Please register early as places are limited to 70.

Posted in Conference, Posts | Leave a comment

Young researchers' conference on dissent: Call For Papers

Displacement, Transgression and Dissent in France, Great Britain and the American Colonies (c.1600-1800)

A young researchers’ conference, Aix-Marseille University, Friday 20 and Saturday 21 March 2015

Guest speaker: Prof. Frank Lestringant (Paris-Sorbonne University)

 CALL FOR PAPERS

One of the main consequences of the Reformation in Europe, and of colonial expansionism, was a transformation of religious, social and political thought at a time when Copernicus, Galileo and Kepler were revolutionising conceptions of the universe.

This conference sets out to examine norms and transgressions in relation to issues such as:

  • knowledge and science;
  • religious dissent and political radicalism;
  • the ontological status of man;
  • definitions of reason and forms of unreason, including melancholy and madness;
  • new discourses of body and mind, including those that shaped concepts of sexual behaviour deemed abnormal or contrary to Nature;
  • the emergence of a political sphere;
  • the beginnings of a public sphere

The aim of the conference will be to investigate how these and related issues were explored in literary and artistic forms, as for example in poetry, satirical pamphlets, travel writings and utopias, drama and theological or moral controversies.

Beinecke Flickr Laboratory CC-BY-2.0

Two page opening including sermon on Exodus 20.17
James Marshall and Marie Louise Osborn Collection, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, Beinecke Flickr Laboratory CC-BY-2.0

 The conference is organized by Aix-Marseille University Research Centres on French Literature and on the Anglophone World and co-sponsored by two learned Societies, SEAA 17-18 (Anglophone World, 17th and 18th Centuries) and SFEDS (French Literature of the 18th Century).

Doctoral students and young researchers should send an abstract (250-500 words) and a short CV conjointly to the three organizers before 1 September 2015:

Prof. Anne Dunan-Page (anne.page@univ-amu.fr),

Prof. Stéphane Lojkine (stephane.lojkine@univ-amu.fr)

Prof. Jean Viviès (jean.vivies@univ-amu.fr)

Continue reading

Posted in CFP | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dissenting Studies Seminar Series

Seminar in Dissenting Studies, the Lecture Hall, Dr Williams’s Library, 14 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0AR. All are welcome. Those with an interest in Dr Williams’s Library and its collections and in the history of Protestant dissent are especially invited to attend.

Wednesday 2 July 2014 5.15 to 6.45 pm

Graham Jefcoate (Nijmegen and Chiang Mai), 'The Tribulations of Johann Christoph Haberkorn: An Eighteenth-Century London Printer and his Dealings with Pietists and Moravians'

 In March 1771 Friedrich Wilhelm Pasche, a Lutheran clergyman in London, met Mr. Metcalf, an attorney, to discuss the matter of the “Haberkornian debt”. Johann Christoph Haberkorn, a printer formerly of Grafton Street, Soho, owed money for goods he had received on credit many years before. In this lecture we shall trace the background of the “Haberkornian debt” through the printer’s dealings with German Lutheran Pietists and Moravians in mid-eighteenth-century London.

Although Haberkorn’s account books have not been preserved, a range of archival sources, including the correspondence of London’s Pietist clergy, enables us to reconstruct the sequence of events in outline. The sources also provide a (perhaps unexpected) insight into the role of the clergy within London’s large German-speaking community. The narrative that emerges may also challenge some preconceived ideas about foreign communities in eighteenth-century England. At the centre of that narrative is Haberkorn himself, a significant figure in the contemporary book trade but also an individual profoundly affected by the religious thinking and the confessional conflicts of his time.

Graham Jefcoate (1951) studied English Literature at Cambridge and Library Science at University College London. With a background in rare books cataloguing and curatorship, he has held senior positions at the British Library and Berlin State Library. From 2004 he worked in the Netherlands where he was Director of the Nijmegen University Library until he took early retirement in October 2011. He has published widely in the fields of Anglo-German bibliography, book trade history, library history, library management and innovation. Since retirement he has been writing and lecturing on heritage collections and on various aspects of the Anglo-German relationship in the eighteenth century. His monograph on German printers, booksellers and publishers in eighteenth-century London is due to be published in November 2014.

Speaker’s email: g.p.jefcoate.70@cantab.net

Book forthcoming with De Gruyter Verlag:

http://www.degruyter.com/view/product/422026

For more information about the Seminar in Dissenting Studies contact James Vigus (j.vigus@qmul.ac.uk) or see

http://www.english.qmul.ac.uk/drwilliams/events/current.html

Posted in Posts | Leave a comment

Revisiting Early Modern Prophecies

26-28 June 2014, Goldsmiths, University of London

http://www.gold.ac.uk/history/research/panaceasociety/propheciesconference/

'The Reformation dramatically changed Europe’s religious and political landscapes within a few decades. The Protestant emphasis on translating the Scriptures into the vernacular and the developments of the printing press rapidly gave increased visibility to the most obscure parts of the Bible. Similarly, Spanish and Italian mystics promoted a spiritual regeneration of the Catholic Church during the Counter-Reformation. Prophecies, whether of biblical, ancient or popular origin, as well as their interpretations gradually began reaching a wider audience, sparking controversies throughout all levels of society across Europe. In recent years, new research has eroded the long standing historiographical consensus of an increasing secularisation accelerated by the Enlightenment, which allegedly cast away beliefs in prophecies and miracles as outmoded. The multiplication of case studies on millenarian movements suggests a radically different picture, yet many questions remain. How did prophecies evolve with the politico-religious conjunctions of their time? Who read them? How seriously were they taken?'

Posted in Posts | Leave a comment

Dissenting Studies Seminar Series

Dr Tessa Whitehouse (Queen Mary) will speak at the Seminar for Dissenting Studies on ‘Family, Memory and Materiality in Nonconformist Life-Writings of the Long Eighteenth Century’, Wednesday 11 June 2014, 5.15-6.45pm, Dr Williams’s Library, 14 Gordon Square, London.

All are welcome to attend. Tessa’s abstract is below, and further information about the seminar series can be found at:

http://www.english.qmul.ac.uk/drwilliams/events/current.html.

Life writing encompasses a diversity of purposes, forms and repositories, making it a challenging subject for literary historians of religion. For religious dissenters, collective and individual records were crucial to sustaining their traditions and understanding their place in national history. This paper will pursue two related questions: why was biography so important for dissenters in the eighteenth century, and what was the role of women in the production of nonconformist culture? It will do so by investigating the material circumstances of production, preservation and dissemination of life writings as well as their form and content. It will concentrate on the activities of Mercy Doddridge and Jane Attwater and the exemplary memory of Elizabeth Rowe for dissenting women writers, asking how an author’s confessional identity might find its way into the structure and content of her writing, and with what literary effect. The relationship between the archival practices of familial and religious communities over time and individuals’ writings will also be a central aspect of this paper.

Posted in Posts | Leave a comment

Dissenting Studies Seminar Series

Professor E. Wyn James (Cardiff) will speak at the Seminar for Dissenting Studies on:

 ‘The Radical Welsh Baptist Minister, Morgan John Rhys and his American Travel Diary, 1794-95’

Wednesday 30 April 2014, 5.15-6.45pm, Dr Williams’s Library, 14 Gordon Square, London.

All are welcome to attend. For an abstract and further information about the seminar series, please see http://www.english.qmul.ac.uk/drwilliams/events/current.html.

Posted in Posts | Leave a comment

Research Assistant needed

Professor Vera Camden (Kent State) is looking for a Research Assistant in the summer 2014 (c.25 hours in total, perhaps slighly over) for archival work, especially at Dr Williams’s Library and other London archives, on the manuscripts and correspondance of Mary Franklin and her granddaughter Hanna Burton.

If you are interest and would like more details about the work involved, please contact Professor Camden directly: vcamden@kent.edu

Posted in Job advertisement | Leave a comment

Dissent and the Hanoverian Succession

'Dissent and the Hanoverian Succession', The tenth annual one-day conference of the Dr Williams's Centre for Dissenting Studies (a collaboration between the School of English and Drama, Queen Mary, University of London, and Dr Williams's Library) will take place on:

Saturday 10 May 2014

Dr Williams's Library, 14 Gordon Square WC1H 0AR

See the complete programme on the Centre's website, http://www.english.qmul.ac.uk/drwilliams/events/c2014.html

Posted in Conference | Leave a comment

Dissenting Studies Seminar Series

Ralph Stevens (Cambridge) will speak at the Seminar for Dissenting Studies on:

 ‘The Toleration Act, Chapels-of-Ease, and the Legacy of Restoration Partial Conformity’

Wednesday 12 March 2014, 5.15-6.45pm, Dr Williams’s Library, 14 Gordon Square, London.

All are welcome to attend. For an abstract and further information about the seminar series, please see http://www.english.qmul.ac.uk/drwilliams/events/current.html.

Posted in Seminar | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

CFP: Huguenot Networks in Europe, 9-11 September 2015

435px-Bookstore_of_the_Huguenots_in_Amsterdam_(1715)The Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland is planning a 6th International Huguenot Conference for 9, 10, 11 September 2015.

The conferenceto be entitled Huguenot networks in Europe, 1550-1800: the impact of a minority, will be held at Europe House, Westminster – London base of the European Commission (two days) – and Boughton House, Northamptonshire – home to the Duke of Buccleuch’s outstanding collection of French Huguenot fine and decorative artwork (one day).

Download the first call for papers here.

Posted in CFP | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

EMoDiR seminar

Tuesday 4th March, at the University of Verona, Helena Wangefelt Ström (University of Umeå) will speak on  'The petrifying eye of the beholder: Heritigisation of religion in Swedish 17th century travel journals'. The event is part of a series of seminars organised by the international EMoDiR.

here

If you don't know it already, EMoDiR (Research Group in Early Modern Religious Dissents and Radicalism) is 'an international research group dedicated to the study of religious differences, conflicts and plurality during the early modern period'. 

For more information, and for its activities, see its website, http://www.emodir.net/

Posted in Seminar | Leave a comment

CFP: Godly Governance, York, 17-28 June 2014

Godly Governance: Religion and Political Culture in the Early Modern World, c. 1500-1750
University of York (UK), 27th-28th June 2014
Religious and political thought have seldom been entirely separable, but this was especially the case following the seismic changes that characterized the early modern period. These transformations affected the relationship of the religious and the political, blurring the boundaries between sacred and secular, public and private in ways previously inconceivable. These two sources of power met on a large scale in wars of religion or the establishment of national churches. But this period also witnessed the internalization of godly governance: manuals describing self-regulation, covering topics as diverse as child-raising, managing the home, ordering the diet, and dying well, abound. Intersections between these two facets of early modern life fill the period’s literature, music, art, and material culture, in the spaces of high culture and the quotidian, in performative and textual expression. Recent work has established that both religion and politics intersect with confessional identities, material culture, the spatial imagination, intellectual and patronage networks, and across manuscript and print culture. This conference seeks to illuminate the entanglements and confrontations between God and government in these diverse fields, hoping that the study of these difficult but fruitful meeting places can open up new avenues of understanding about the early modern world.
Confirmed Keynote Speakers: Prof. Peter McCullough (Oxford) and Dr Lucy Wooding (KCL).
Posted in CFP | Leave a comment

Richard L. Greaves Prize: Appointment of the Selection Committee

Did you know that since 2004, every three years, a research Prize in the memory of Richard L. Greaves is awarded by the international John Bunyan Society for a "for an outstanding book-length work of scholarship devoted to the history, literature, thought, practices and legacy of Anglophone Protestantism to 1700."

This is wonderful opportunity to publicize work in the field among the public, so let your commissioning editors know that they can approach the selection committee.

The new selection committee has just been made public: it is chaired by N. H. Keeble (Stirling), with Ann Hugh (Keele) and Cynthia Wall (Virginia).

It will examine monograph and collective volumes published from January 2013 to January 2016 and the Prize will be presented at the 8th Triennal conference of the International John Bunyan Society in the summer 2016.

You can download the regulations and procedures  here  and get more information directly from the website of the IJBS, http://johnbunyansociety.org.

Posted in Award | Leave a comment